Bodgers – GPS

 

This week we looked at GPS which stands for Global Positioning System. The idea behind GPS is based on time and the position of  a network of  satellites. The satellites have very accurate clocks and the satellite locations are known with great precision.

Each GPS satellite continuously transmits a radio signal containing the current time and data about its position. The time delay between when the satellite transmits a signal and the receiver receives it is proportional to the distance from the satellite to the receiver. A GPS receiver monitors multiple satellites and uses their locations and the time it takes for the signals to reach it to determine its location . At a minimum, four satellites must be in view of the receiver for it to get a location fix.

We used the Adafruit Ultimate GPS Breakout connected to an Arduino as our GPS receiver. It’s very easy to set up, all we did was install the Adafruit GPS library on our Arduino and this gave us a load of programmes to chose from. We used the parsing sketch which gave us Longitude, Latitude and our location in degrees which we used with google maps to show our location.

See you all again on the 23/Mar/19

Declan, Dave and Alaidh

 

Bodgers – Pi Camera & OpenCV

This week in the Bodgers group we looked at the Pi Camera Module which is a high quality image sensor add-on board for the Raspberry Pi. You can capture images  from the command line with:

 raspistill -o cam.jpg 

This will take a jpeg picture called cam which will be saved in your home folder.

You can take a picture from your Python script with:


from time import sleep
from picamera import PiCamera

camera = PiCamera()
camera.resolution = (1024, 768)
camera.start_preview()
# Camera warm-up time
sleep(2)
camera.capture('foo.jpg')

This will save a picture called foo in the folder you ran your script from.

OpenCV (Open source computer vision) is a library of programming functions mainly aimed at real-time computer vision. We tried a couple of scripts out, one from the Hackers group, thanks Kevin, that detects colours and another one that detects shapes, we will be looking at this much more in the next few sessions but next Saturday we will look at using an Arduino and a Raspberry Pi together.

See you all then.

Declan, Dave and Alaidh

Week 5, Explorers – Pen Commands

Hello Everyone,

A special welcome to all our new members that came to us this week, I hope you enjoyed yourself and hope to see you back again soon.

Thank you all for coming again this week. This week we looked at pen commands, we have not done this before in the Explorers group so it was new for everyone.

pencommand

We also created some variables which we set as sliders which again is something we had not done before with this group.

 

sliders

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here are the full Pdf version of my notes from this weeks session. CDA-S8 Week 5-Pen Command.pdf

Martha

Creators: Shootah Part 5 – Edges

spaceship.png

This week we extended our colliders so that we could used them to prevent the player going off the edges of the screen. We used it to show how software design needs to evolve.

Colliders

Our colliders were designed to be connected to an object with three things:

  1. A property  containing the x-coordinate of its location
  2. A property y containing the y-coordinate of its location
  3. A function hit() which was called if the attached collider touched another collider

Something to Connect To

We had colliders already attached to our:

  1. Enemy
  2. Bullets

but we didn’t have anything to attach to that could represent the side of the screen.

We created a new class called Static() with nothing more than the x, y  and hit() that we needed so that we could connect a collider to it (stored in one more property – collider).

Screen Edges

We created a pair of these colliders positioned at the right and left-hand side of the screen. We made sure to add them to our list in check_colliders(). Nothing much happened. Why? Well, first, the Player didn’t have a collider, so we added one, liberally copying code from Enemy, which a minor change to the description argument.

Now we could see the contact occurring between the edge and the player, though nothing was stopping it moving yet.

Unintended Consequences

As  often happens with code, this change had unexpected consequences; bullets were not firing properly any more. Why? Because the player now had a collider and the bullets were becoming inactive immediately because they were hitting that. The fix was to modify the Bullet’s hit() function to ignore hitting a collider with the description “player”.

Stopping the Player Moving

We now knew our player was hitting an edge, but another problem became apparent: we didn’t know which edge!

To properly stop the player and stop it moving too far, we really needed to know which side of the player the collider we’d hit was, but that information wasn’t available to us with the current design.

A couple of quick changes were necessary:

  1. In Collider.touching(), instead of just passing the descriptors to the objects hit() functions, we changed it to pass the Collider itself.
  2. In all the hit() functions, we had to made a small adjustment to account for the fact that we were now getting a Collider and not just a string.

With the extra information from the collider, were were able to determine how far the player should be allowed to move to and prevent it going further by setting the x value appropriately.

Download

The files for this week can be found on our GitHub repository.

Hackers – How to Steer an Autonomous Wheeled Robot to Drive Towards a Detected Object

During the same session at which we figured out how to translate joystick movements into motor signals for a robot with two drive wheels (https://coderdojoathenry.org/2019/02/24/hackers-how-to-control-a-robots-wheel-motors-based-on-joystick-movements/), we moved on to figuring out how to control the motor so as to steer an autonomous robot towards an object of interest.

Again, we did a bunch of calculations on a whiteboard (see end of post), and I have re-drawn them for this post.

This builds on the previous work, led by Kevin, on object detection in Python: https://coderdojoathenry.org/2018/12/06/hackers-starting-with-object-recognition/

We assume the setup is as follows:

  • We have a robot with two wheels attached to motors, one on the left and one on the right
  • We have code to control the motors for the two wheels (which we call Motor M1 and Motor M2) with a value in the range -1 to 1, where 1 is full speed ahead, 0 is no movement, and -1 is full speed reverse
  • We have a camera mounted on the robot, facing directly ahead
  • We have code to get an image from the camera and can detect an object of interest, and find its centre (or centroid) within the image

The objective is:

  1. If the object is in the middle of the image, robot should go straight ahead (M1=1, M2=1)
  2. If the object is to the right, move forward-right (e.g. M1=1, M2=0.7)
  3. Likewise, if the object is to the left of centre, move forward-left (e.g. M1=0.7, M2=1)
  4. If the object is not found, we turn the robot around in a circle to search for it (M1=1, M2=-1)

The first three of these are illustrated below:

steering

Our solution is to treat this as a variant of what we previously worked out before, where we had a joystick input, where the X direction of the joystick controls forward movement and its Y direction controls whether to move left or right. In this case, we are steering left/right while always moving forward. Therefore, X has a fixed value (X=1) and Y is a value that depends on the direction of the object of interest.

The equations we came up with are:

X = 1 (a fixed value)

Y = (W – HWid) * YMax / HWid

Then use X and Y to calculate the motor control values as before:

M1 = X + Y, constrained to being between -1 and +1

M2 = X – Y, constrained to being between -1 and +1

steering3

Here:

  • X is a fixed positive value: X=1 for full speed, or make it smaller to move forward more slowly
  • Y is calculated from the equation above
  • W is the distance of object’s centre from left edge of the image, in pixels
  • HWid is half the width of the image, in pixels (for example, for a basic VGA image, 640×480, HWid is 640/2 = 320)
  • YMax is a value approximately 0.5, but needs to be calibrated – it depends on how sharply you want your robot to steer towards the object
  • M1 is the control signal for Motor M1, in the range -1 (full reverse) to +1 (full forward)
  • M2 is the same for Motor M2
  • Constrained means: if the calculated value is less than -1, set it to -1; if it is greater than +1, set it to +1.

Here are our calculations on the whiteboard:

whiteboard-calcs2

Hackers – How to Control a Robot’s Wheel Motors Based on Joystick Movements

robot+controller

At our most recent session in the Hackers group in CoderDojo Athenry, we spent out time on practical mathematics, figuring out how, if we want to make a robot that is controlled by a person with a joystick, how exactly do we translate movements of the joystick to signals sent to the motors.

joystick-robot-assumptions

Our assumptions are:

  • We are controlling robot with 2 drive wheels, one on the left and one on the right, like the one shown in the photo above (which we made last year)
  • We assume that we have code to control the motors for the two wheels (which we call Motor M1 and Motor M2) with a value in the range -1 to 1, where 1 is full speed ahead, 0 is no movement, and -1 is full speed reverse
  • To make the robot turn, drive the motors M1 and M2 at different speeds
  • We assume that we have code to receive signals from the joystick, and get X and Y values in the range -1 to 1, as shown in the diagram below

Our approach was to think about what joystick positions (X and Y) should result in what robot movements (M1 and M2), and then see if we could come up a way of expressing M1 and M2 in terms of X and Y. We filled a whiteboard with satisfying diagrams and calculations; see the bottom of this post. I have re-dawn them for clarity below.

The resulting equations are quite simple:

M1 = X + Y, constrained to being between -1 and +1

M2 = X – Y, constrained to being between -1 and +1

Here:

  • M1 is the control signal for Motor M1, in the range -1 (full reverse) to +1 (full forward)
  • M2 is the same for Motor M2
  • X is the forward position of the joystick from -1 (full back) to +1 (full forward)
  • Y is the left/right position of the joystick from -1 (full left) to +1 (full right)
  • Constrained means: if the calculated value is less than -1, set it to -1; if it is greater than +1, set it to +1.

Here is the full set of joystick positions and motor movements that we considered, showing how the equations work:

joystick-all-calcs

We previously figured out how to control motors with a H-bridge controller from an Arduino: https://coderdojoathenry.org/2019/02/07/hackers-controlling-robot-wheels-and-handling-interrupts-in-arduino/

Each motor needs two control signals in the range 0-255, one for forward and one for reverse, so we will need more code to convert our M1 and M2 to what is needed for the H-bridge, but that is a fairly easy job for a different day.

whiteboard-calcs1

Week 4 – 2019 – Explorers

Hello everyone.

Good to see everyone there on Saturday. We finished our game from the previous week, similar to on old game called Breakout.

wipeout

We used a number of important coding concepts again this week, loops and decisions, Variables, broadcasting, etc.

concepts

Don’t forget we are off for the next two weeks. Enjoy the Break!

Here is a link to the notes: CDA-S8_Week 8-Wipeout.pdf

 

Martha

Creators: Shootah Part 4 – Colliders

 

This week we mainly dealt with building and using a box collider in our game. The box colliders are written in a way such that:

  • They are connected to something in the game and follow it around
    • What they are attached to must have the properties x and y for position
  • It is possible to test if they are touching each other
  • If two colliders are found to be touching, we tell the things that they’re attached to that they’ve been hit by something
    • What they are attached to must have a function hit() that we can call

 

Extents of the Collider

Our collider is a box, of a given width and height, centred on the x and y of the thing it’s connected to:

Untitled Diagram

For checking collisions, we need to know the values of the left and right side of the box and the y values of the top and the bottom of the box.

For convenience, we write a function which returns an object (using curly brackets) with the left, righttop, and bottom values (shortened lr, t and b respectively) as properties:

extents(){
  return {
    l: this.connected.x - this.width / 2,
    r: this.connected.x + this.width / 2,
    t: this.connected.y - this.height / 2,
    b: this.connected.y + this.height / 2
  };
}

When making an object like this, we set a property value by first writing the property name, followed by a  colon (:)  and then a space and the value we want it to have. Each property is separated with a comma. The don’t need to be on separate lines, but it makes it easier to read.

 

Touching Colliders

So how do we know that two colliders are touching? Actually there are four ways in which they definitely can’t be touching:

  • One is completely to the left of the other
  • One is completely to the right of the other
  • One is completely above the other
  • One is completely below the other

And if none of these are true, then it must be touching. So actually, we’re going to check that they’re not NOT touching (double negative, used correctly!).

How do we know if something is completely to the left of something else? Look at this diagram:

 

Untitled Diagram (1)

We know that box 2 (in blue) is totally to the left of box 1 (in orange) because we can see it is, but how could get the computer to check it? Remember, left and right are just x values on the screen. Box 2 is left of box 1 because both it’s left and right values are smaller than the left value of box 1.

The checks for the other directions are very similar:

  • The second box is right of the first box when both of it’s x values (left and right) are greater than the first’s right side.
  • The second box is above of the first box when both of it’s y values (top and bottom) are less than the first’s top side.
  • The second box is below of the first box when both of it’s y values (top and bottom) are greater than the first’s bottom side.

 

Sending Messages

Each collider has a property disc that describes the thing, or type of thing, that it’s connected to.

All colliders know what they’re connected to, so when we determine two have touched, we call a function called hit() on each of the connected objects, passing it the desc of the other collider. This means, in our game, when our enemy is hit, it can know that it’s been hit by a bullet – or maybe something else – and react appropriately.

 

Checking Every Collider Against Every Other

In our code, we gather all the active colliders at each frame. We then need to check each one against each every other one. How can we do that?

Consider a list of four items:

Untitled Diagram (2)

To check them all against each other we first need to check 0 against the other three. Simple enough.

We we need to check 1. But we don’t need to check 1 against 0, since we already did that. Nor do we need to check it against itself. We only need to check it against 2 and 3.

If we write out the full sequence, we see that for four items we need three passes to check all combinations:

  • First pass: Check 0-1, 0-2, 0-3
  • Second pass: Check 1-2, 1-3
  • Third pass: Check 2-3

We can write a pair of loops to do this:

for (let i = 0; i < c.length - 1; i++){
  for (let j = i + 1; j < c.length; j++){
    c[i].touching(c[j]);
  }
}

Note two things about these loops:

  • The first loop goes from zero, but stops one short of the last item in the list (i < c.length – 1). It picks the first item to be checked.
  • The second loop doesn’t start from zero. It starts from what ever i currently is, plus one. It picks the second item to be checked.

 

Other Stuff

We also did a few other things this week:

  1. We fixed a small bug that was keeping our spaceship moving when we didn’t want it.
  2. We added a little drag to slow the spaceship down to a stop when we lift our fingers off the keys
  3. We set bullets inactive when they hit something

 

Download

The files for this week can be found on our GitHub repository.

Bodgers – Introduction to Arduino

Hello again everyone.

I was away this week so Dave led the group, they did a couple of Arduino projects. They  revisited the traffic lights from December but this time used the Arduino to control them and then moved on to  a temperature and humidity sensor called the DHT11.

 

Here is the wiring diagram for  the traffic lights and you can find the code here.

arduino lights

 

Here is the wiring diagram for the DHT11 and the code is also on Dropbox here.

dht

We will be doing more with the Arduino particularly for some of our projects.

See you All again on Saturday

Declan, Dave and Alaidh